Streetwise Professor

December 20, 2015

The Crude Export Ban Is Gone, But Don’t Get Your Hopes Up

Filed under: Commodities,Energy,Politics,Regulation — The Professor @ 2:50 pm

Well, ding dong the wicked export ban is dead. The repeal was included in the wretched omnibus deal passed in the dead of the night last week.

As a matter of economic principle, banning the ban is a good thing. Trade restrictions are almost always inefficient, and the oil export ban was no exception to that rule. In the near term, however, the practical impact of the sunsetting of the ban will be limited. At present, Louisiana Light Sweet is trading about par with Brent on a spot basis, and at only a few cents discount on a forward basis. Even given the quality premium for LLS, the differential is too narrow to make it economical to transport oil to Europe. This situation differs dramatically from the conditions that sparked the move to eliminate the ban, namely, a double digit discount of US oil prices from Brent.

The narrowing of the spread was due to many factors, but probably the most important of these was the fact that although oil exports were banned, exports of refined products were not. The low domestic oil prices made refining, including refining for export, to be very profitable. This encouraged investment in refining capacity that increased the demand for US crude, which narrowed the spread.

The repeal of the ban essentially creates an option, and this option is valuable. Although exporting crude is not economic now, it will be in response to some economic shocks. For instance, a disruption of European supplies, a spike in US production, or a big refinery outage in the US would all tend to depress the US price relative to the price in Europe, and if the shock is big enough, this could open the arb.

As for those who think that the lifting of the ban will help US producers in their hour of need, get ready for disappointment. The price difference between the export and no-export worlds is capped by the no-export-world spread: if absent the ban the price difference is greater than transportation costs, lifting the ban raises the domestic price and lowers the foreign price until the spread equals the cost of transport. When the arb channel is closed (as is currently the case), lifting the ban has no effect. Any price effect from lifting in the ban will occur in the future, and will be contingent on future supply and demand conditions. My guess is that the elimination of the ban will periodically give a couple of bucks boost to the US oil price. Not a huge deal.

The lifting of the ban will help traders, to the extent that arbs periodically come into play. It will also periodically benefit infrastructure owners (e.g., pipelines, terminals, and ports) that hand exports. Refiners  will lose when the arbitrage opens: this is why the compromise included a modest tax break for refiners, to secure their support.

Perhaps the biggest losers are those who bet on the continuation of the ban by building condensate splitters: minimally processed crude and condensate could be exported, so the splitters were a way to circumvent the ban. They are now white elephants, as the crude can be exported directly.

All in all, the lifting of the ban is not a big deal. Perhaps the main effect of this development, at least in the short term, is to show that 239 years after the publication of the Wealth of Nations, bad arguments about trade survive and even thrive. But even this didactic effect is overshadowed by circumstances, because the continued success of Trump shows the same thing, and much more forcefully.

In sum, I’m glad to see the ban go, but am underwhelmed by the near-term effects of its demise.

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1 Comment »

  1. Perhaps the biggest losers are those who bet on the continuation of the ban by building condensate splitters: minimally processed crude and condensate could be exported, so the splitters were a way to circumvent the ban.

    Funny, there is at least one OPEC country which does much the same thing: classified its production from one field as condensate to dodge the quota.

    Comment by Tim Newman — December 21, 2015 @ 11:25 am

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